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MARCH 3, 2015

Our first meeting was with LA talent manager, Stirling McIlwaine. He runs Pearl Group Entertainment in Santa Monica. As we walked into the building Stevie told me not to worry if he came across a little direct with his advice. Apparently, he’s pretty down to business.

And once we got into his office and started talking, he was pretty down to earth. Right away he asked me why I was an artist, what I considered my successes, what my frustrations were.

 

After we listened to a couple of tracks from my new record, both Stirling and Stevie really had some major critiques. Their biggest issues were with my choruses (or lack of them). Stirling told me that if I really wanted to reach broader audiences there was a proven formula – verse, chorus, verse, bridge, chorus, out –. He offered a lot of concrete steps I could take to improve the album’s commercial viability.

I don’t really compute the “commercial viability” but I happened to agree about the choruses and I was struggling with them, especially since everything is recorded already…anyway, happy to keep working on it.